Camp Nano Is In Session!

Why, hello! It’s already the second day of Camp Nano!

My goal this session is to write 30 pages in 30 days; yesterday, I wrote 5 pages of script (which is much easier than 5 pages of prose or poetry for me). The hardest part was just getting started—it’s so easy to write without any regards to formatting in prose just because I’ve done it for so long that it’s ingrained in my brain, but I had to search up some sources online for help with formatting a script (I didn’t even know where to begin!). If you’re curious, below are the resources I used:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Screenplay

http://www.bbc.co.uk/writersroom/writers-lab/scriptwriting-essentials

http://www.screenwriting.info/

https://www.finaldraft.com/mm_media/mm_pdf/How_to_Format_a_Screenplay.pdf

http://www.storysense.com/format.htm

http://www.filmscriptwriting.com/

http://www.scriptmag.com/

http://www.scriptreaderpro.com/script-writing-blog/

I’ve written 5 pages, but it’s only 897 words with proper formatting, and I’ve just realized how different writing a script is compared to writing prose or poetry; I’m using the simplest and most concise words I can think of, and only bare action is involved (I can’t write down the characters’ thought processes at all). There’s no need to be extremely witty or careful about how my words flow in my action lines either; my attention is mainly focused on the dialogue between my characters. Descriptions are sparse, and I’m letting the “directing reins” slack a bit—I can’t control the way the camera moves, or dictate how every character says every line, or style them right down to the nail polish on their toes; also, characters unimportant to the plot are simplified until they’re simply “Coworker #1” or “Student #2″—for example, I can’t deviate from the central story and provide a little humorous background or insight into their thoughts before returning to the plot at hand.

I think that a novel would be a grand sort of cruise ship, decorated with gold-embossed furniture and red carpets, while a a script would be like a slim torpedo. Both get to their destinations in due time, but in different ways—for example, a cruise ship would take its time and stop at multiple locations along the way to its final destination whereas a torpedo would zoom straight to its target. Both novels and scripts are good at different things, too; novels can reveal the mind of a character and thus can do character-driven plots very well, while scripts are good at showing action without being too clunky or long-winded or even confusing (plot-driven stories). Of course, novels can be plot-driven and scripts can be character-driven, but that was my initial thought!

Anyways, I’ve got to write some more today, but here is my favorite line from yesterday:

“Hey, I gotta run, my mother’s on the warpath—apparently, I shouldn’t have told her that Lizzy’s pregnant by text.”

See you next time!

Today’s Happenings

I did not go to church today; I spent the morning doing AP Biology homework, and went out to dim sum for lunch with my mother and sister. After going back home, I wrote a bit before getting ready for a dance performance at a local nursing home. It was so much fun and I enjoyed the chance to talk with them and bring some smiles to their faces! It is now almost five o’clock, and I need to do some Latin homework and some more AP Biology homework, as well as some chemistry and calculus. I’ll probably end the night with some more writing and a descent into Youtube musical theatre madness.

This Week’s Playlist

  1. Lost by Chris Miller and Nathan Tysen (sung by Barrett Wilbert Weed)
  2. I Push Up My Glasses by Nikko Benson and Claire Tran (sung by Barrett Wilbert Weed)
  3. Legally Blonde (OBC)
  4. Dear Evan Hansen (OBC)
  5. History of Wrong Guys (from Kinky Boots) 

Reading

  1. The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry by Larry Gonick and Craig Criddle
  2. This Is Just To Say by William Carlos Williams
  3. Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen
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